101 Dalmatians (1961)

| All Ages 
Cautions:  slang, minced oaths and some name-calling, and brief immodesty

101 Dalmatians is a classic Disney animated film with all the more innocent traditional Disney elements:  friendly animals, bumbling side characters, a villain scary but not too scary, and a happy ending with a catchy song.  With less beauty than earlier movies like Bambi and Snow  White, but possibly more violin swells and a zero body count, 101 Dalmatians is a youngster-friendly animated movie that will satisfy the average adult cartoon-fan as well.

1961 | Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton S. Luske, Wolfgang Reitherman | 79 min Watch Trailer

Slang, Minced Oaths, and Some Name-Calling
By Jove
By Jove
By Jove
By George
By George
What in thunder
Good heavens
For heaven’s sakes
What the…
blast
blast
blast
blast
blast
blast
blast
bloomin’
bloomin’
bloomin’
blimey
blimey
blimey
blinkin’
blinkin’
blinkin’
blinkin’
shut up
shut up
shut up
shut up

There is occasional mild name-calling, mostly from one evil henchman to another.  Names include “twerp”, “bumbling blockhead”, “clumsy clod”, and the like.  The main human character’s adoring wife calls him an idiot twice, once joking (they both laugh), and once when he interrupts her to make a rash, unfounded (albeit true) accusation to someone.  A side character calls the villainess “crazy woman driver” after she attempted to run him off the road.  A puppy sticks out its tongue at someone.


Brief Immodesty
A couple of magazine covers of women in low necklines or a bathing suit are seen for a few seconds (and are dismissed by the main canine character as not being the right sort of woman for his master).

The villainess is seen in a low, sleeveless dress, but it is covered for the most part by her coat, and her physique is skeletal, not sensual.


Note:
One of the puppies is named Lucky, and dogs wish each other good luck a couple of times, but the “luck” apparently means positive events, rather than a positive force.  A foolish dog repeats a rumor that a house is “haunted or bewitched, or some such fiddle faddle,” and then adds that care should be taken anyway, because there’s no knowing what sort of “hocus pocus” may be there.  Nothing comes of this, however.

The villainess is called a “devil woman” and a “witch” several times, and “Hell Hall” is her family estate, though she is never implied to actually be involved in any occult pursuits.

The villainess says that she “worships” fur, and asks rhetorically if there is a woman in the world who doesn’t.

There is occasional mild violence or intensity.  Bad guys come after puppies with a fire poker and a chair leg.  Villains try to drive a van off the side of a cliff.  There is a brief car wreck involving the villains, but no one is hurt.  Dogs are briefly seen with their teeth bared.  There is talk of “popping off” and skinning the puppies.  There is also occasional comical pain involving the villains.

The main human character, Roger, writes a song about how evil the villainess Cruella DeVille is (even though she is not known to have done anything illegal yet), and it becomes a big hit.

Dogs are implicitly portrayed as being of equal, though perhaps different, intelligence to human beings, having long-term plans and taking rational and even clever precautions (disguises, walking on ice so as not to leave tracks, etc.).  The dogs’ vocabulary has their human masters as their “pets”, although humans are still portrayed as being generally in charge.

The villainess’ scheme to make a fur coat out of dog skins is portrayed as horrific and inhuman, implying either that fur coats in general would be horrific, or, more innocently, that dogs have a special status among animals.

After learning that Cruella Deville is planning to buy the puppies, the emotional female dog briefly wishes she wasn’t having any.

The main canine character Pongo’s idea of an attractive mate, both for himself and for his master, is initially based on the females’ appearance, though partly as an indicator of their character.

A dog called “the Colonel” is foolish and incompetent, although other animals with military titles are portrayed as being very capable.

Prison is briefly referred to as paying one’s debt to society.

The good guy smokes a pipe, and the villains smoke cigars and cigarettes.

A bad guy is seen drinking from a bottle.

The human main characters have a Christmas tree.



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