Back to the Future

 For: strong humanism, sensuality, foolish behavior, and pervasive strong language

Back to the Future is a classic story of a handful of jerks vying, wittingly or unwittingly, for control of cosmic destiny… only without the classic ending where everyone learns how to not be a jerk.  On the technical side, Back to the Future’s story is very well put together, but not well enough to transform the characters’ constant blaspheming, sexual looseness, and god-playing into acceptable entertainment for biblically-minded Christians.



Strong Humanism
The whole plot of Back to the Future is Marty McFly’s ability to write and rewrite history however he wants or needs to.  Marty’s trip back in time replaces, for this fictional world, the reality of God’s involvement in the fates both of humans and of humanity.

Marty is able to erase humans with souls (including himself), who were living in 1985, from existence - leaving them to annihilation, not an afterlife.


Sensuality
Marty’s negatively-portrayed mom (1985) is the one who lectures Marty about sexual immorality and (at least outwardly) has high standards for female behavior.  Marty’s positively-portrayed mom (the new-and-improved 1985) is the one who’s excited for Marty because he and his girlfriend are finally getting to spend the night together.

Marty’s mom, as a seventeen-year-old, continually tries to seduce the young men she likes into sensual acts.  For example, she grabs a young man’s leg under the table, and, playing innocent, tries to get her parents to let him sleep in her room.  She tells a teenage boy that she looked at him in his underwear while he was asleep, and it is implied that she is the one who took his clothes off him in the first place.  In another scene, she gets alone with a boy in a car, lets her plunging strapless dress fall lower still, crawls toward the boy, and then throws herself on him in a very passionate kiss.

Marty’s dad (in 1955) is shown sitting in a tree, with binoculars, watching a girl (shown in her underwear) dress.  This is not negatively portrayed.

Marty and his girlfriend kiss (or try to) several times, put their arms around each other, and talk about their plans for their overnight date.

It is said of Marty’s (1955) parents, that “if they can’t kiss, they can’t fall in love.”


Foolish Behavior
Positively-portrayed characters lie throughout the movie.  Marty, especially, lies casually and reflexively on multiple occasions.  He and his girlfriend each lie to their parents so that they can spend the night together without their parents knowing.

Marty is portrayed as an irresponsible kid with a bit of an attitude problem, but cooler because of it.

When Marty’s mishaps in the “past” prevent his parents from meeting the way they were supposed to, his attempts to put them back on track to falling in love all center around getting them to kiss.  Marty’s grown-up mother tells her children that it was her later-husband’s kiss that made her, at seventeen, want to spend the rest of her life with him.


Pervasive Strong Language
J-sus Chr-st
J-sus Chr-st
J-sus
J-sus
J-sus
J-sus
J-sus
J-sus
G-d
G-d
G-d
G-d
G-d
G-d
G-d
G-d
G-d
G-d
G-dd-mn
G-dd-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
d-mn
h-ll
h-ll
h-ll
h-ll
h-ll
h-ll
h-ll
b-tch
b-tch
b-tch
b-stard
b-stard
b-stard
b-stard
b-stard
Holy sh-t
Holy sh-t
sh-t
sh-t
a--hole
a--
a--

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